In workers’ compensation, a “scheduled loss award” is a benefit paid to an injured worker for the loss of use of a body part. The most common scheduled loss awards are for the loss of use of an arm, a leg, or an eye.

The value of a scheduled loss award is set by state law and is based on a percentage of the worker’s average weekly wage. The number of weeks that the award is paid depends on state law.

In most states, an injured worker can receive a scheduled loss award and benefits for temporary total disability or permanent partial disability. However, in some states, an injured worker can only receive one type of benefit.

Read on to learn about scheduled loss awards in workers’ compensation!

What are scheduled loss awards in workers’ compensation?

In general, a “scheduled loss award” is a benefit paid to an injured worker for the loss of use of a body part. The most common scheduled loss awards are for the loss of use of an arm, a leg, or an eye.

The value of a scheduled loss award is set by state law and is based on a percentage of the worker’s average weekly wage. The weeks that the award is paid also depend on state law. In most cases, an injured worker will receive a scheduled loss award in addition to benefits for temporary total disability or permanent partial disability. However, in some states, an injured worker can only receive one type of benefit.

How are scheduled loss awards calculated?

The value of a scheduled loss award is calculated as a percentage of the worker’s average weekly wage. The rate varies depending on the body part that was injured. For example, in most states, an injured worker who loses the use of an arm will receive an award that is worth two-thirds of their average weekly wage.

The number of weeks a scheduled loss award is paid varies by state. Generally, the longer a worker has been employed, the more weeks they will receive benefits. For example, a worker employed for ten years or more may receive benefits for up to 260 weeks.

Can an injured worker receive both a scheduled loss award and an unscheduled loss award?

In some cases, an injured worker may be eligible to receive both a scheduled loss award and an unscheduled loss award. An unscheduled loss award is paid for the loss of use of a body part that is not explicitly listed in the state’s workers’ compensation law. For example, if an injured worker loses the use of two fingers, they may be eligible to receive an unscheduled loss award in addition to their scheduled loss award.

What are the benefits of receiving a scheduled loss award?

There are several benefits of receiving a scheduled loss award:

  1. A scheduled loss award can provide financial stability for injured workers and their families.
  2. A scheduled loss award can help an injured worker pay for necessary medical care and treatment.
  3. A scheduled loss award can help an injured worker return to work by covering the cost of vocational rehabilitation.

Are there any drawbacks to scheduled loss awards?

There are a few potential drawbacks to scheduled loss awards.

First, the value of a scheduled loss award may be less than the worker’s actual wage loss.

Second, the number of weeks a scheduled loss award is paid may be less than the length of the worker’s disability.

Finally, in some states, an injured worker may only receive one type of benefit, either a scheduled loss award or benefits for temporary total disability or permanent partial disability.

Scheduled loss awards in workers’ compensation are designed to compensate an injured worker for the loss of use of a body part. These awards are based on a percentage of the injured worker’s pre-injury wages. Contact the experienced workers’ compensation attorneys San Gabriel Workers’ Compensation Attorney at (626) 602-9483 to learn more about scheduled loss awards and how they may affect your workers’ compensation case.

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